Wearable Foods Series

Wearable Foods Series by Yeonju Sung:

Beautiful and edible pieces from the artist!  I love this series so much and had to share this =)

yeonju sung 1 yeonju sung 2 yeonju sung 3

The artist’s website stated this about the series:

“Wearable Foods series, Constructed art forms made with food.

As a fine artist, [Yeonju Sung] fell in love with photography as a main tool and a medium to create her visions.

“Wearable Foods” series is the first long term project she started two years ago and it still continues to this day.

This series deals with the concept of creating images that interchange the actual reality and the made-up reality on many levels. This body of work is her version of the made-up reality, which destroys the core meaning of clothing, which is the ability to be worn.

This series of her work forces viewers to defy the actual meaning, the functionalities, and the aspects of what clothing signifies in our lives. The essence of clothing and food has been reinterpreted. Each element does not fulfill its own role and yet, each suggests an unconventional and even contradicting role – un-wearable clothing that is made out of the materials that do not last.

These images trigger some of our fundamental senses: Desire to wear clothes; desire to eat. But her images don’t fulfill the senses either and they are interchangeable stories between the actual and the made-up reality.

Yeonju’s spectacular images make you believe and desire her made-up reality.”

yeonju sung 4 yeonju sung 5 yeonju sung 6

Art Merge Lab from LA, which exhibited the series, stated this about the series in 2012:

“In her photographs of clothing constructed from materials that could never realistically be worn, Yeonju Sung captures what she describes as a series of phantoms—temporal checkpoints depicting objects destined to decay, objects that fail in function what they seem to fulfill in appearance. Sung begins by constructing a garment form out of foodstuffs such as eggplant, lotus root, tomato, and banana. She then photographs these articles of culinary couture, effectively removing context from purpose and concealing the degradation effects of time. Sung recognizes the inability of her organic pieces to carry out the function which they signify—and she likewise exposes the limits of the photographic image as it conveys a fleeting reality, a moment of meaning that will never exist beyond the printed page.”

Little Slide Dress by Emily Steel

Little Slide Dress by Emily Steel:

This is really clever; I can picture clothes of the future being something similar to this but probably of feather-like weight. It would be so cool for the people involved to be a part of this when the dress was lit for the first time. This reminds me of the clothes (or rather body hugging suits) from the film Tron, which would light up once the characters were in combat. So much technology is involved with these designs!

“The Little Slide Dress is a modern take on the classic Little Black Dress. It uses modern technology and blends it with a 100-year-old medium, film. The Dress draws inspiration from classic movies and the ‘magic of film’ to create a wearable piece of technology and art. With film light is so important in the creation and viewing of images and this was one of the driving forces behind the dress’s creation. With film only see what really going on once the lights go out. For this to work there needs to be a balance of projected and ambient light something the Little Slide Dress tries to emulate.

The dress is constructed out of individual slide film images that are backed with LED’s. An Arduino Lilypad connected to a light sensor controls the brightness of the LED’s. The sensor reads the how much ambient light there is and uses this value to determine if the LED’s will be off or on. When there is lots of light the LED’s are off and it looks like a shiny black dress with small hints that something else is going on. Once the sensor determines there is the right amount of light for LED’s to be seen in their full brightness it turns them on. When the dress is on the lights slowly pulse and the images on the dress come alive.”